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Implicit memory, Imprinting, Behaviour and Sleep

Posted on 13 March, 2017 at 0:15

What is implicit memory?


Well, iimplicit memory is a subconscious memory related to previous experiences that are imprinted into your brain. If you tune into yourself deeply, and you become deeply aware of sensations, you can become aware that certain environments, sensations, smells, touches, tastes, sounds or situations will trigger a feeling and emotion related to a previous experience and time. Its different to our explicit or recall memory of daily events, like remembering last years holiday on a bleak January day!


We all have implicit memory;


Babies brains develop capacity for implicit memory as early as 3-4 months in utero, so from that time they absorb all the sensations we experience. So some experiences become imprinted in our memories, good and not so good. Birth experiences for example can become imprinted into our memory, and we know that birth can influence and affect us in many ways, including health, behaviours and sleep. Imprinting can go very deep, its linked to our implicit memory, but its the feelings and deep emotional memories that we hold.


When working with young children's sleep and behaviours then, Its important to look beyond the observable behaviours, the surface stuff as I call it, and dig deeper, teasing out what may be influencing them on the deeper, biological, social/emotional levels. Its only then that we can find appropriate and holistic answers to seemingly difficult sleep and behavioural issues.


Have a look at these videos about Implicit memory, Imprinting and how birth influences our lives - Enjoy!!


The imprint: What it is and how it is impacting on your life:


Ray Castellino and Infant Sentience: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Owc5xxVAASU ;


Microbirth: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CTmwUU2iHU ;


Related article: Making Assumptions about children's sleep: http://maternityinstitute.com/making-assumptions-about-childrens-sleep/

Categories: Emotional Wellbeing, Parenting, Birth Psychology